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 Herb name:
 Tagetes lucida: Mexican marigolds
250
  Uses 
Reduces stress & anxiety, anise-flavoured tea

Tagetes Oil is sedative to the nervous system and promotes sleep as it counters stress and anxiety. The herbage of Tagetes lucida can be infused, boiled, or ground to produce a paste. The infusion of one bundle with water makes two to three cups of an aromatic tea, a sufficient dosage to produce profound stimulating and aphrodisiac effects.

MEDICINAL USES:
The leaves and whole plant are digestive, diuretic, febrifuge, hypotensive, narcotic, sedative and stimulant[3][11][7][5]. Use of the plant depresses the central nervous system, whilst it is also reputedly anaesthetic and hallucinogenic[5]. It is used internally in the treatment of diarrhoea, nausea, indigestion, colic, hiccups, malaria and feverish illnesses[5]. Externally, it is used to treat scorpion bites and to remove ticks[5]. The leaves can be harvested and used as required, whilst the whole plant is harvested when in flower and dried for later use[5]

The Aztecs used all species of Tagetes for medicinal purposes, such as in a tea made from the infusion of the fresh herbage to treat hiccups and diarrhea. T. lucida promotes lactation, and it is also added to bath water to help relieve the symptoms of rheumatism (Siegel et al. 1977).

Up to 2 grams of the dried plant matter taken orally has been found in some to cause alertness, lucidity, a feeling of well-being, closed-eye visual and a warming of the body lasting 2-3 hours. Dream enhancement was also reported (Voogelbreinder 2009, 324).

A pleasant anise-flavored tea is brewed using the dried leaves and flowering tops. This is primarily used medicinally in Mexico and Central America http://entheology.com/plants/tagetes-lucida-marigolds/ In Argentina, a decoction of the leaves is taken for coughs, and can be applied topically on the skin as an insect repellent.

In India, juice from the freshly pressed leaves of marigolds is administered to treat eczema (Voogelbreinder 2009, 324). Up to 2 grams of the dried plant matter taken orally has been found in some to cause alertness, lucidity, a feeling of well-being, closed-eye visual and a warming of the body lasting 2-3 hours. Dream enhancement was also reported (Voogelbreinder 2009, 324).

TRADITIONAL USES:
Tagetes lucida, widely identified as a powerfully psychoactive strain of the marigold flower, was first documented by the Aztecs. They used Tagetes lucida in a ritual incense they referred to as yyauhtl. Aztecs used the leaves as a flavouring of 'chocolate' a foaming cocoa-based drink.

CULINARY:
The leaves have a tarragon-like flavor, with hints of anise & can be used as a tarragon substitute. Can be used fresh or dried for flavoring soups, sauces etc. The dried leaves and flowering tops are brewed into a pleasant anise-flavoured tea.

Snip off the last few inches from new fast-growing tips. Dried leaves are not as good. Better to freeze or store in vinegar. As with any aromatic herb, add to soups, sauces, chicken dishes, etc. near the end of cooking or the flavors will be lost to evaporation. A soothing, aromatic herbal tea is made from the leaves & herbal vinegars.

CULTIVATION
Light: Full sun or partial shade.
Moisture: Needs well-drained soil. Is fairly drought tolerant.
Frosts: may fill it to the ground but it will come back in spring.

Propagation:
Usually propagated from stem cuttings, which root easily. You also can divide the roots.
Sow seeds at the end of winter. Only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 2 weeks.

FOR GARDENERS:
Secretions from the roots of growing plants have an insecticidal effect on the soil, effective against nematodes and to some extent against keeled slugs[7], they also have an effect against some persistent weeds such as couch grass[8]. These secretions are produced about 3 - 4 months after sowing[7].
The growing plant also has a repellent effect on various insect pests such as the asparagus beetle and bean weevils[8][9].

A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers[10]. The dried plant is burnt as an incense and to repel insects.


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